All about dust devils and surface generated convective turbulence

Hello all! So if some of you have noticed after a batch of much relatively cooler air rolls in to an area, the air will seem to have much more turbulent energy built in to it. If you have high surface radiation (no clouds), you will have a high surface temp relative to the air temperature. This will cause small areas (pockets) of air to rise up to equalize the temperature of the air from the surface warming up. These pockets of rising air are what your airplane collide with to cause all of that pesky turbulence you encounter.
You will also feel this when coming in for landing on a relatively cold day as well. The warm runway surface acts like a boiler plate in that it constantly sends air upwards relative to the air around the runway. This will cause you to pop up higher than normal when you go to round out for your flare, cause you to float farther down the runway and can even cause you to lift back off the runway after you get the plane on the ground. The lifting of the air often manifests itself into a small tornado like phenomenon called a dust devil. If you see a dust devil close to the runway on landing, go around! They will not hurt you in most cases but they will disturb your airplane to the point that a safe landing isn’t as sure of a bet. Dust devils can be a bit frightening for a pilot at times but if you’re airborne, you have nothing to worry about due to fact that they only flow upwards. They will shake the plane around a bit but at least they wont push you down into the ground. So in short, if you’re airborne, they are all bark and no bite.
If you are on the ground however, it is another matter entirely. Dust devils can flip your plane upside down in certain circumstances. This type of incident is almost exclusive to cessnas and other high wing aircraft though. The only way to negate this from happening is to position the controls correctly, mostly by pushing forward on the controls to keep the elevator down and tilting your ailerons away from the direction of the wind.
I hope this helps somebody survive a dust devil! Talk to you again soon!

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